USA Hockey Magazine

September 2019

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B ET W E E N T H E P I P ES GOALIE DRILL OF THE MONTH "51 in 30" is the battle cry behind the new USA Hockey goaltending initiative with the goal of having 51 percent of NHL and National Women's Hockey League goaltenders be American born by 2030. 51 IN 30 GOALIE PROFILES NATALIE FERENC Orchard Lake, Mich. Tip Option CATS MAY HAVE NINE LIVES but a goaltender only has two eyes. That's why cat eye goaltending masks are not allowed to be used in USA Hockey sanc- tioned games. Cat eye masks are popular among professional goaltenders because the wider, tapered eye hole provides greater visibility compared to the grid-like cage. The eye hole is small enough to keep a puck from passing through, but that says nothing about a stick blade. It may seem like a one-in-a-million chance that a stick blade will find its way through the iron bars, but there are enough examples of it happening to keep young goaltenders away from using one. USA Hockey requires goaltenders to wear a helmet and mask that has been certified by the Hockey Equipment Certification Council. Sometimes goalies will try to game the system by keeping two masks in their bags, one with the cat eye mask and the other legal one. A goaltender found wearing unap- proved equipment will be instructed to leave the ice and not return until he or she has an approved helmet and mask. "We're all about American goalies respecting the rules," said Steve Thompson, the manager of goaltend- ing for the ADM. "We don't see forwards coming onto the ice with half shields so we shouldn't see goalies coming onto the ice trying to sneak a cat eye." In recent years, manufacturers have developed a modified cat eye mask, which meets HECC standards. Coaches, parents and players are encouraged to educate themselves on the differences between goalie masks on the mark. The safest way to find out if a mask is legal is to look for a valid HECC certifi- cation sticker. KEEPING AN EYE OUT FOR CAT EYE MASKS 18 // SEPTEMBER 2019 USAHOCKEYMAGAZINE.COM UNITED STATES HOCKEY LEAGUE k Natalie's prowess between the pipes start- ed from the time she was 6. She remembers always wanting to be the volunteer goalie even though everyone on the team was supposed to get a chance. Over the years she's back- stopped Little Caesars to a pair of Michigan state championships. She also made her mark on the national stage competing in sever- al USA Hockey Girls Player Development Camps, and earned a spot on the U.S. Under- 18 Women's National Team that won a silver medal at the 2019 IIHF Women's Under-18 World Championship. Ferenc will attend the University of Vermont in the fall. • Player 1 stands in the high slot and can shoot or pass the puck to Player 2, who stands in front of the goalie. He can either wait for a tip or a pass, or pass the puck to either Player 3 or Player 4, who are standing on the face-off dots. Once Player 3 or Player 4 receives the pass they must shoot on net. Player 2 can look for a rebound. • Goalies work on reading the play and adjusting to the proper depth and angle while changing direction to follow the play. If the goalie drops to butterfly on the pass to Player 2, and Player 2 passes the puck to Player 3 or Player 4, he or she must quickly get back to his or her feet and maintain a proper angle and stay square to the puck. k Coaches, parents and goaltenders can get exclusive access to the USA Hockey Mobile Coach app on iPhone and Android devices. The app includes scores of goaltending specific drills, practice plans and videos. There's even a goaltender activity tracker including shot/save tracker that breaks down performance by zone for improved instruction and goaltender development. USA Hockey coaches can design a practice plan on their desktop computer and sync it to their mobile devices. Download the Mobile Coach application in the Apple App Store or at Google Play. Goalie Training On the Go

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